HudsonAlpha leader among influential group

WASHINGTON and HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — Richard M. Myers, Ph.D., president and director of HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology, has been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

“Considering the many exciting advances and discoveries taking place across the spectrum of science, I am honored to be included among this year’s fellows,” said Myers. Myers, formerly chair of the department of genetics at the Stanford University School of Medicine, stepped up to guide genomic research when HudsonAlpha launched its facilities and programs in 2008.

Through the fellows program, AAAS acknowledges Myers for his contributions in the area of human genomics, research, technology development and administration at the national and local levels.
The 2011 fellows roster includes 539 members whose scientifically or socially distinguished efforts have advanced science or its applications. The 2011 fellows will be presented an official certificate and a gold and blue (representing science and engineering, respectively) rosette pin on Saturday, 18 February from 8 to 10 a.m. at the AAAS Fellows Forum during the 2012 AAAS Annual Meeting in Vancouver, B.C., Canada.

This year’s AAAS Fellows will be formally announced in the AAAS News & Notes section of the journal Science on 23 December 2011.

The tradition of AAAS Fellows began in 1874. Currently, members can be considered for the rank of fellow if nominated by the steering groups of the association’s 24 sections, or by any three fellows who are current AAAS members (so long as two of the three sponsors are not affiliated with the nominee’s institution), or by the AAAS chief executive officer.

Each steering group then reviews the nominations of individuals within its respective section and a final list is forwarded to the AAAS Council, which votes on the aggregate list.

The council is the policymaking body of the association, chaired by the AAAS president, and consisting of the members of the board of directors, the retiring section chairs, delegates from each electorate and each regional division, and two delegates from the National Association of Academies of Science.
 

Contact Name:

Holly Ralston

Contact Email:

hralston@hudsonalpha.org

Organization Background:

The HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology in Huntsville, Alabama, is the cornerstone of the Cummings Research Park Biotechnology Campus. The campus hosts a synergistic cluster of life sciences talent – science, education and business professionals – that promises collaborative innovation to turn knowledge and ideas into commercial products and services for improving human health and strengthening Alabama’s progressively diverse economy. The non-profit institute is housed in a state-of-the-art, 270,000 square-ft. facility strategically located in the nation’s second largest research park. HudsonAlpha has a three-fold mission of genomic research, economic development and educational outreach. * * * The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is the world’s largest general scientific society, and publisher of the journal, Science (www.sciencemag.org) as well as Science Translational Medicine (www.sciencetranslationalmedicine.org) and Science Signaling (www.sciencesignaling.org). AAAS was founded in 1848, and includes 262 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals. Science has the largest paid circulation of any peer-reviewed general science journal in the world, with an estimated total readership of 1 million. The non-profit AAAS (www.aaas.org) is open to all and fulfills its mission to “advance science and serve society” through initiatives in science policy, international programs, science education, and more. For the latest research news, log onto EurekAlert!, www.eurekalert.org, the premier science-news Web site, a service of AAAS.

File Attachment:

HudsonAlpha leader among influential group

WASHINGTON and HUNTSVILLE, Ala. — Richard M. Myers, Ph.D., president and director of HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology, has been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

“Considering the many exciting advances and discoveries taking place across the spectrum of science, I am honored to be included among this year’s fellows,” said Myers. Myers, formerly chair of the department of genetics at the Stanford University School of Medicine, stepped up to guide genomic research when HudsonAlpha launched its facilities and programs in 2008.

Through the fellows program, AAAS acknowledges Myers for his contributions in the area of human genomics, research, technology development and administration at the national and local levels.
The 2011 fellows roster includes 539 members whose scientifically or socially distinguished efforts have advanced science or its applications. The 2011 fellows will be presented an official certificate and a gold and blue (representing science and engineering, respectively) rosette pin on Saturday, 18 February from 8 to 10 a.m. at the AAAS Fellows Forum during the 2012 AAAS Annual Meeting in Vancouver, B.C., Canada.

This year’s AAAS Fellows will be formally announced in the AAAS News & Notes section of the journal Science on 23 December 2011.

The tradition of AAAS Fellows began in 1874. Currently, members can be considered for the rank of fellow if nominated by the steering groups of the association’s 24 sections, or by any three fellows who are current AAAS members (so long as two of the three sponsors are not affiliated with the nominee’s institution), or by the AAAS chief executive officer.

Each steering group then reviews the nominations of individuals within its respective section and a final list is forwarded to the AAAS Council, which votes on the aggregate list.

The council is the policymaking body of the association, chaired by the AAAS president, and consisting of the members of the board of directors, the retiring section chairs, delegates from each electorate and each regional division, and two delegates from the National Association of Academies of Science.

Media Contact: Beth Pugh
bpugh@hudsonalpha.org
256-327-0443

About HudsonAlphaHudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology is a nonprofit institute dedicated to innovating in the field of genomic technology and sciences across a spectrum of biological problems. Its mission is three-fold: sparking scientific discoveries that can impact human health and well-being; fostering biotech entrepreneurship; and encouraging the creation of a genomics-literate workforce and society. The HudsonAlpha biotechnology campus consists of 152 acres nestled within Cummings Research Park, the nation’s second largest research park. Designed to be a hothouse of biotech economic development, HudsonAlpha’s state-of-the-art facilities co-locate scientific researchers with entrepreneurs and educators. The relationships formed on the HudsonAlpha campus allow serendipity to yield results in medicine and agriculture. Since opening in 2008, HudsonAlpha, under the leadership of Dr. Richard M. Myers, a key collaborator on the Human Genome Project, has built a name for itself in genetics and genomics research and biotech education, and boasts 26 biotech companies on campus.