Tim Townes honored for work on sickle cell and related blood disorders

HUNTSVILLE, Ala — Tim Townes, Ph.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham, was awarded the HudsonAlpha Prize for his work on sickle cell and related blood disorders. The $20,000 monetary award acknowledges exceptional talent, dedication and discovery by Alabama’s best and brightest researchers.

The prize was announced at the HudsonAlpha Spring Benefit held April 26. “In research you never speak lightly of curing a disease, but if anyone is going to cure sickle cell, it will be Tim,” said Rick Myers, Ph.D., director and president of the HudsonAlpha Institute.

Townes has dedicated his career to studying the molecular genetics of gene expression in red blood cells and exploring approaches to treat disorders such as sickle cell anemia. Townes is professor and chair of the department of biochemistry and molecular biology at UAB.

Using mice, Townes and research colleagues have been able to reprogram cells that mimic sickle cell anemia as induced pluripotent stem cells. Such cells have the potential of becoming any type of tissue. The researchers have corrected the DNA mutation in the gene associated with sickle cell disease, placed the cells with the corrected DNA back into the donor mice and had the result of healthy red blood cell production.

Townes has repeated similar steps in humans, except for having the corrected cells placed back into the donor.

The HudsonAlpha Prize is made possible by the Alpha Foundation.  The prize rewards research in the life sciences that seeks to improve human or environmental health, or agricultural yields, while elevating research careers and endeavors for current and future students in biotechnology.  Historically, the pool of nominees, comprised of leading scientists at Alabama’s public research universities, includes individuals or teams who are sharpening the cutting edge of critical knowledge.

Media Contact: Beth Pugh
bpugh@hudsonalpha.org
256-327-0443

About HudsonAlphaHudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology is a nonprofit institute dedicated to innovating in the field of genomic technology and sciences across a spectrum of biological problems. Its mission is three-fold: sparking scientific discoveries that can impact human health and well-being; fostering biotech entrepreneurship; and encouraging the creation of a genomics-literate workforce and society. The HudsonAlpha biotechnology campus consists of 152 acres nestled within Cummings Research Park, the nation’s second largest research park. Designed to be a hothouse of biotech economic development, HudsonAlpha’s state-of-the-art facilities co-locate scientific researchers with entrepreneurs and educators. The relationships formed on the HudsonAlpha campus allow serendipity to yield results in medicine and agriculture. Since opening in 2008, HudsonAlpha, under the leadership of Dr. Richard M. Myers, a key collaborator on the Human Genome Project, has built a name for itself in genetics and genomics research and biotech education, and boasts 26 biotech companies on campus.

Tim Townes honored for work on sickle cell and related blood disorders

HUNTSVILLE, Ala — Tim Townes, Ph.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham, was awarded the HudsonAlpha Prize for his work on sickle cell and related blood disorders. The $20,000 monetary award acknowledges exceptional talent, dedication and discovery by Alabama’s best and brightest researchers.

The prize was announced at the HudsonAlpha Spring Benefit held April 26. “In research you never speak lightly of curing a disease, but if anyone is going to cure sickle cell, it will be Tim,” said Rick Myers, Ph.D., director and president of the HudsonAlpha Institute.

Townes has dedicated his career to studying the molecular genetics of gene expression in red blood cells and exploring approaches to treat disorders such as sickle cell anemia. Townes is professor and chair of the department of biochemistry and molecular biology at UAB.

Using mice, Townes and research colleagues have been able to reprogram cells that mimic sickle cell anemia as induced pluripotent stem cells. Such cells have the potential of becoming any type of tissue. The researchers have corrected the DNA mutation in the gene associated with sickle cell disease, placed the cells with the corrected DNA back into the donor mice and had the result of healthy red blood cell production.

Townes has repeated similar steps in humans, except for having the corrected cells placed back into the donor.  

The HudsonAlpha Prize is made possible by the Alpha Foundation.  The prize rewards research in the life sciences that seeks to improve human or environmental health, or agricultural yields, while elevating research careers and endeavors for current and future students in biotechnology.  Historically, the pool of nominees, comprised of leading scientists at Alabama’s public research universities, includes individuals or teams who are sharpening the cutting edge of critical knowledge.  
 

Contact Name:

Holly Ralston

Contact Email:

hralston@hudsonalpha.org

Contact Phone:

256.508.8954

Organization Background:

The HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology in Huntsville, Alabama, is the cornerstone of the Cummings Research Park Biotechnology Campus. The campus hosts a synergistic cluster of life sciences talent – science, education and business professionals – that promises collaborative innovation to turn knowledge and ideas into commercial products and services for improving human health and strengthening Alabama’s progressively diverse economy. The non-profit institute is housed in a state-of-the-art, 270,000 square-ft. facility strategically located in the nation’s second largest research park. HudsonAlpha has a three-fold mission of genomic research, economic development and educational outreach.

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